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How to Write a Thesis Statement for a Character Analysis Paper

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❶Remember, in writing thesis statements, you must pull out a solid argument. Follow the outline above to come up with a good literary analysis.

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Examples of thesis statement for an Character Analysis essay
Examples of thesis statement for an Literary Analysis essay
Language & Lit

In "The Hunter," E. Doctorow weaves setting, style, and characterization together to create a tension of oppositions: I have always been here! Andrew Marvell's "To His Coy Mistress" develops a carefully constructed argument where the speaker seeks to persuade his lady to surrender her virginity to him. Andrew Marvell's "To His Coy Mistress" argues for sexual freedom in opposition to empty social proprieties mores restricting sexual activity.

Andrew Marvell's "To His Coy Mistress" argues against romantic or courtly views of love in favor of a more "honest" eroticism. Andrew Marvell's "To His Coy Mistress" reveals the speaker's attempt to use the physical pleasures of sex to resist, ignore, or escape the empty reality of a lifeless eternity. Andrew Marvell's "To His Coy Mistress" expresses a cynical, self-centered view of life that sees the only escape from the despair of a lifeless eternity in the physical pleasures of sexual intimacy.

Andrew Marvell's "To His Coy Mistress" expresses a cynical view of life through the use of hyperbole, sexual innuendo, and mocking humor. Andrew Marvell's "To His Coy Mistress" argues that life must be lived to its fullest because life is fleeting carpe diem. Additional things to keep in mind when crafting a thesis statement Since works of literature are open to multiple interpretations, more than one thesis statement can be generated for a work.

There are a number of examples of this in the chart above. Without that imagery, the novel would be very different, and Orwell would have had difficulty setting up a believable world for the reader. Write a thesis statement. The thesis statement is the main idea of your paper.

You want to cover your basic argument to let your readers know what you plan to argue. For a literary analysis, you should connect the main idea or theme of the work to a specific way the author shows it. Organize your argument from start to finish. How you organize your essay is up to you. One typical method is to go through the book in order, providing your evidence starting at the beginning of the book and moving towards the end. Another method is to present your most important part of the argument first and work down from there.

Set up your main ideas or paragraphs. Write down a Roman numeral for each main idea you want to cover in your essay, as well as your introduction and conclusion. Next to the Roman numeral, jot down that main idea in a shortened form. Provide background information and historical context for III. Introduce the author's main theme IV. Establish how imagery helps create the theme V. Add the main points you want to cover in each paragraph. Under each Roman numeral, use letters and then Arabic numerals to go into more detail about what you want to cover in each section.

You can be very specific or just cover the basics. However, the more specific you are, the easier it will be to write your essay. Introduce work, including author, title, and date B. In , Orwell's use of imagery to establish a bleak and dreary world is key to bringing home his theme that totalitarianism is something to be avoided at all costs.

Provide background information and historical context for A. Bring up Orwell's experiences in Spain 1. Experiences of fascism influenced work 2. Feared totalitarianism on the right and left C. Coined phrase "cold war" III.

Introduce the author's main theme A. Warning against totalitarianism 1. Party in complete control 2. No privacy, even for thoughts 3. Orwell thought this was the logical conclusion of a complete totalitarianism IV.

Establish how imagery helps create the theme A. Book begins with bleak, colorless imagery, sets up tone B. Description of urban decay creates a feeling of the world falling apart B. Contrasting imagery when Winston has experiences with Julia, re-establishes purpose of main imagery V. Introduce each main topic with a couple of introductory sentences.

With each point you make, provide a short introduction to it at the beginning of the paragraph. This just establishes what the idea is. It can also connect the idea to the rest of your text.

That means that with each paragraph you add, you need to connect it to the main thesis of the essay. Doing so helps your reader see the overall point you're making. Backup your points with quotes from the text. When you're writing a literary analysis, you must show your reader where you found the evidence in the text. That means, when you make an assertion about the text, you need to add a quote or paraphrase the text to back up what you're saying.

Then, explain what the quote means and how it supports your point. Make sure your analysis of the quote takes up at least as much space as the quote itself. For example, you might add, "From the very beginning of the novel, Orwell establishes that this world is bleak and dreary, one that no one would want to live in; he writes: Analyze how your evidence backs up the main point you're making.

With this step, you need to answer why the point you're making is important. Show the reader that the evidence you provide relates to your main argument. This world is harsh to inhabitants, "cold" and foreboding, without even color to break up the monotony. A bright, sunny day doesn't even provide a reprieve from this bleakness, and Orwell uses passages like these to establish that this world could be the future, a harsh reality with no escape into fantasy or pleasantries.

If you haven't already, fill in your introduction. Part of your introduction should be your main thesis, but you should also introduce the main points you want to make throughout the essay, as well as the work itself.

Imagine a world where every facial expression, every movement, every word you say is endlessly scrutinized by an overreaching government.

Anyone who breaks the rules or steps out of line is punished harshly. If it sounds like a bleak reality that no one would want to live in, that was entirely George Orwell's point in writing the novel , a book that creates a picture of a dystopian future where citizens are controlled by a totalitarian government.

This point was driven home for him by his time spent in Spain under fascism, as well as political climate of the time, which was World War II. In the conclusion, you need to draw your argument back together and tie it up neatly for your reader. That way, they can see how everything fits together. For Orwell, the fact that the world could be headed towards totalitarianism was disastrous.

That fate, no matter whether it came from the right or left, was something every citizen should fight against. In his novel, Orwell shows the logical conclusion of a world controlled by totalitarianism, and it's through the literary device of imagery that he draws the reader into that world.

Once the reader experiences that dreary world, they will want no part of a government that could thrust them into that harsh reality. Make sure your argument makes sense from beginning to end. Try to read through your essay as if you had never read the text you're analyzing.

Can you follow the argument with just the assertions, evidence, and analysis you've provided? If you can't, try going back through and filling in any blanks. You can also ask a friend to read through it to see if they can follow it. Take out phrases like "I think" or "In my opinion. However, when you present your argument, leave out these phrases. It weakens your argument, and signals to the reader you're not confident in what you're doing.

Proofread your essay by reading it out loud. Watch for any mistakes your spellcheck catches, but you should also check it yourself. Reading it out loud helps you slow down and catch more mistakes in the text. Let someone else proofread it. It always helps to have another set of eyes when proofreading. Ask a friend, parent, or classmate to go over your essay to see if they catch any grammatical mistakes.

Steps and Structure in Writing a Literary Analysis Essay:

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The Thesis Statement of a literary analysis essay - tells your reader what to expect: it is a restricted, precisely worded declarative sentence that states the purpose of your essay. When given an assignment to analyze a work of fiction, poetry, or drama, you must .

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*A thesis statement is usually, but can be more than, one sentence long. Examples of Literary Thesis Statements: * “Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn is a great American novel.” *What’s wrong with this thesis statement? *An opinion about the book, not. an argument.

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Developing a Thesis for a Literary Analysis Paper Basically, the thesis statements for all literary analysis papers follow this general formula. Basically, the thesis statements for all literary analysis papers follow this general formula: Developing a Thesis for a Literary Analysis Paper Literary convention(s)[optional].

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A literary analysis essay discusses a particular aspect of a work of literature. It essentially presents an argument or an interpretation about that work. Developing a clear, concise thesis for a literary analysis essay is highly important in guiding the reader through the essay and expressing your. What is a thesis statement? A thesis statement: tells the reader how you will interpret the significance of the subject matter under discussion. is a road map for the paper; in other words, it tells the reader what to expect from the rest of the paper. directly answers the question asked of you. A thesis is an interpretation of a question or subject, not the subject itself.