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Lord of the Flies

Lord of the Flies Symbolism Essay

❶Choosing Jack's "fun" tribe indicates a dangerous level of emotionally based self-indulgence.

Lord of the Flies Thesis Essay

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The following paper topics are designed to test your understanding of the novel as a whole and your ability to analyze important themes and literary devices. Following each question is a sample outline to help get you started. The main characters in Lord of the Flies experience a loss of identity throughout the book that eventually causes the devastation and death that prevail. His original view of the island as a paradise B. His leadership qualities and ideas C.

Inability to remember his purpose E. His own minor digressions into savagery. The rejection and acceptance of his ideas C. The gradual symbolic camouflage D. Examine the characters of Ralph, Jack, or Piggy in terms of what they possess that link them with their past lives, and what their emerging roles on the island are. Is there any indication which of these characters may be advancing more rapidly toward savagery than the others?

What is the symbolism of the conch? Why does it seem to have so much power? What characteristics does it have in common with what it appears to symbolize? How does the result foreshadow events to come? What is the result of the fire? Why are the creeper vines significant? What is the meaning of the beast that makes its first appearance in this chapter?

Does this foreshadow its later significance? How does the beast become real to the boys? Compare their emerging viewpoints in their argument together on the beach. What does this say about the two boys and their roles as civilized young men? What divisions are becoming apparent among the boys on the island? Trace the characters and who they are allied to at this point. Discuss these alliances and why they are occurring.

Both boys are outsiders like Piggy, yet seem to be accepted. Based upon these observations, present an argument for whom they will eventually ally themselves and explain why. What is the significance of the camouflage paint that Jack puts on? How does it affect his personality? Why will it make him a better hunter? In what ways does it hide his personality? In what ways does it reveal his personality?

Trace the references to the beast in the novel thus far. What is the true nature of the beast on the island that Simon is unable to verbally define? Discuss how and why Jack disrupts the meeting.

What is at the core of the power struggle between he and Ralph? What techniques of anarchy and Placing a group of English schoolboys on a deserted tropical island sets up a what-if situation. The novel presumes an atomic war that threatens to wipe out civilization and a small group of children managing to survive on a previously uninhabited island. Its asks whether such children will re-create the democratic civilization they have experienced during their short lives or instead, because of animal survival instincts, revert to some precivilized form of existence.

Finally, if children do slough off the veneer of cultural and ethical standards of conduct, the novel raises the question of the conclusions to be reached concerning human nature. Once it was published in England, however, it achieved immediate success. In this work, the author expresses his feelings after having spent World War II as a naval officer and having witnessed the devastations of that war. These wartime experiences underlie his basic disillusionment with humanity, expressed in this fable of children losing their innocence and precociously assuming adult guilt.

Although Golding continued to express his feelings and questions about the nature of existence in other novels, he never achieved the success of this early venture. The power of Lord of the Flies stems in part from the credibility of the dialogue and conduct of the young characters.

The complexity of the characters avoids the oversimplification that this parable-like story otherwise supports. Boys experimenting with behavior when there are no adults to set limits, seeing rock formations as a castle fortress, and seeking emotional support in friendships all appeal to the reader. The plausibility of the futuristic conditions, in which life choices must be made by survivors of an atomic war, is maintained by the gradual change in the conduct of the boys.

One of the catalysts Golding uses in Lord of the Flies and The Inheritors , his second novel, is refutation of the worldview expressed in an earlier and popular work. Lord of the Flies challenges the unrealistic outlook expressed in The Coral Island: That Victorian adventure novel features three boys marooned on an island with pirates and cannibals. The conch shell, which is used to summon the boys to gatherings and as a emblem of the right to speak at those gatherings, represents order, civilization, and political legitimacy.

Throughout Lord of the Flies, Golding uses these characters and objects to represent and emphasize elements of the themes and ideas he explores in the novel.

Compare and contrast Ralph and Simon. Is there a difference in their goodness? Both Ralph and Simon are motivated toward goodness throughout the novel. Both boys work to establish and maintain order and harmony with the rest of the group and are kind and protective in their interactions with the littluns. Ralph behaves and acts according to moral guidelines, but this behavior and these guidelines seem learned rather than innate. Ralph seems to have darker instinctual urges beneath: After he is killed they find out it was Simon and they don't really talk about it.

This is definitely a big part of the book because Ralph is ashamed of what he did, but on the other hand Jack uses Simon's death as an example later in the book. So now the fear of the beast has caused a death, and the society to start to fall. So the decline in the island society can now be traced back to introduction of fear. Not only did fear ruin a society, but it also leads to people dieing. It also makes the group turn on one another when they go to hunt the beast.

So the fact of the matter is that fear can ruin ever the strongest of societies. This section contains words approx. Browse all BookRags Study Guides.

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In his essay A Moving Target, he stated simply "The theme of Lord of the Flies is grief, sheer grief, grief, grief." The novel ends of course with Ralph grieving the indelible mark of evil in each person's heart, an evil he scarcely suspected existed before witnessing its effects on his friends and supporters.

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Lord of the Flies essays are academic essays for citation. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of Lord of the Flies by William Golding.

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Lord of the Flies - Savagery Essay Words | 5 Pages Lord of the Flies - Savagery “There are too many people, and too few human beings.” (Robert Zend) Even though there are many people on this planet, there are very few civilized people. Lord of the Flies, William Golding's first novel, was published in London in and in New York in Golding was forty-three years old when he wrote the novel, having served in the Royal Navy during the Second World War.

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Aug 23,  · Suggested Essay Topics. secretsofengraving.tk all the characters, it is Piggy who most often has useful ideas and sees the correct way for the boys to organize themselves. The Lord of the Flies by William Golding is a novel in which the theme of savagery versus civilisation is explored. Some British boys are stranded on an isolated island at the time of an imaginary nuclear war.